What are local bookgroups reading?

If you're looking for ideas, you might be inspired by some of the books our local Book Groups are reading....

Autumn by Ali Smith

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'In a country apparently divided against itself, a writer such as Smith is more valuable than a whole parliament of politicians' Financial Times

'Undoubtedly Smith at her best. Puckish, yet elegant; angry, but comforting' The Times

'A beautiful, poignant symphony of memories, dreams and transient realities... The first post-Brexit novel' Guardian

A breathtakingly inventive new novel from the Man Booker-shortlisted and Baileys Prize-winning author of How to be both.

Daniel is a century old. Elisabeth, born in 1984, has her eye on the future. The United Kingdom is in pieces, divided by a historic once-in-a-generation summer.Love is won, love is lost. Hope is hand in hand with hopelessness. The seasons roll round, as ever . . .

'Terrific, extraordinary, playful... There is an awful lot to lift the soul' Daily Mail

'Bold and brilliant' Observer


Birdcage Walk by Helen Dunmore

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It is 1792 and Europe is seized by political turmoil and violence.

Lizzie Fawkes has grown up in Radical circles where each step of the French Revolution is followed with eager idealism. But she has recently married John Diner Tredevant, a property developer who is heavily invested in Bristol's housing boom, and he has everything to lose from social upheaval and the prospect of war.

Diner believes that Lizzie's independent, questioning spirit must be coerced and subdued.

She belongs to him: law and custom confirm it, and she must live as he wants. But as Diner's passion for Lizzie darkens, she soon finds herself dangerously alone.


The Girls by Emma Cline

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If you're lost, they'll find you... Evie Boyd is fourteen and desperate to be noticed. It's the summer of 1969 and restless, empty days stretch ahead of her. Until she sees them. The girls. Hair long and uncombed, jewelry catching the sun. And at their centre, Suzanne, black-haired and beautiful. If not for Suzanne, she might not have gone. But, intoxicated by her and the life she promises, Evie follows the girls back to the decaying ranch where they live. Was there a warning? A sign of what was coming? Or did Evie know already that there was no way back?

`A coming-of-age tale like no other ... the book of the summer' Grazia